How Do You Make It Personal?

How Do You Make it Personal? After All we owe it to THEM, The CIVILIANS!

Someone Recently asked me if there is anything I do to Study Fatal Fires in my State.

Below is the Powerpoint Format I use. I Try to make it as Personal as I can based on the Information Available online. NONE of these Particular Fires I was at, however Based on the Information I put myself there and Play What If’s. I Put in my own Different Factors (Staffing, Time of Day, Location of Fire, ETC…)

To Take it a Step Further I Look up the Actual Radio Traffic Using Broadcastify, Look up Pictures and Videos and Even Make Simulations.

So I ask you: What Do YOU Do to Make it Personal?

When Studying these Fires Look Particularly at: Fire and Smoke Conditions, Where the Victim was Found and In What Conditions they were in, Actions the Fire Department Did, and How it Affected the Rescue Effort.

We are NOT Bashing or Monday Morning Quarter-backing the Departments involved, Instead We are Trying to Learn from their Experiences!

 

 

2017 Civilian Fire Fatalities in Ohio

August Fire Notes

All,

Below is another New Feature I am Trying out. It is Called “Fire Notes” a Collection of Notes, Tips, and Ticks, Quotes, Etc. that I pick up throughout the Month.

Take a Look at it Below and Let me know what You Think. If I Get Good Results with it, I will keep Posting these in the Future.

For a Downloadable PDF Click HERE

Thanks for Taking the Time,
Ethan Bansek

7-2-16 Run Down

Back to Basics: Fireground Decon Drill HERE

What is Aggressive? HERE

The Back-Up Line HERE

How Much Air does a Hose Stream Entrain? HERE

A Quick Drill on the Elephants Cock (Deck Gun) HERE

A New, Downloadable Training Program “Situational Awareness on the Fireground” HERE

Remembering Hackensack (1988)

Take some time to honor the fallen “Hackensack 5” by studying and reviewing the incident. Here are some resources HERE, HERE, HERE

Cincinnati Releases LODD Report of FAO Daryl Gordon HERE, HERE is the Full Report

More Pure Gold Right Here…

Make sure to Subscribe to the YouTube Channel for many more upcoming videos!

Thanks for Taking the Time,

Ethan Bansek

Remembering the Charleston 9

charleston9.jpg

“Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.”

“On June 18, 2007, nine career fire fighters (all males, ages 27-56) died when they became disoriented and ran out of air in rapidly deteriorating conditions inside a burning commercial furniture showroom and warehouse facility. The first arriving engine company found a rapidly growing fire at the enclosed loading dock connecting the showroom to the warehouse. The Assistant Chief entered the main showroom entrance at the front of the structure but did not find any signs of fire or smoke in the main showroom.

He observed fire inside the structure when a door connecting the rear of the right showroom addition to the loading dock was opened. Within minutes, the fire rapidly spread into and above the main showroom, the right showroom addition, and the warehouse. The burning furniture quickly generated a huge amount of toxic and highly flammable gases along with soot and products of incomplete combustion that added to the fuel load. The fire overwhelmed the interior attack and the interior crews became disoriented when thick black smoke filled the showrooms from ceiling to floor. The interior fire fighters realized they were in trouble and began to radio for assistance as the heat intensified. One fire fighter activated the emergency button on his radio. The front showroom windows were knocked out and fire fighters, including a crew from a mutual-aid department, were sent inside to search for the missing fire fighters. Soon after, the flammable mixture of combustion by-products ignited, and fire raced through the main showroom. Interior fire fighters were caught in the rapid fire progression and nine fire fighters from the first-responding fire department died. At least nine other fire fighters, including two mutual-aid fire fighters, barely escaped serious injury.”


NIOSH Report
Phase 2 Report

Please, Do yourself a Favor and dive into this incident. There were MANY Lessons learned, and there are some great resources and information out there on this incident.

Thanks for taking the Time,

Ethan Bansek

Large Area Structural Fire

Below is the latest version of the Secret List. Take a look there are many good resources in it!

 

All,
As the fire service mourns the loss of Firefighter Richard Sheltra, 20, of Pineville, North Carolina, and while the facts are not at all out yet-this is another general but very poignant reminder of the challenges all of us have when operating in large area, commercial, strip mall, big box and related type commercial and industrial building fires.
FIREGROUND VIDEO From Last Nights Tragic Fire
FIREGROUND RADIO TRAFFIC From Last Nights Tragic Fire:
In general, for all of us, large(er) area structural firefighting is a significant challenge. Just a few (of the many) considerations for all of us include…having and knowing the SOG and training on the SOG. Using pre-plans enroute or on arrival and sizing it up. What’s the smoke doing?
Whats the construction type? What’s on the roof? Whats it made of? Do we know the contents of the structure? How about occupants/search/rescue? Is the fire offensive? defensive? Why? If offensive, what’s the search procedure? On a hose line? On a rope? Are you able to do a search? Do you have the needed resources? Remember the challenges related to crew integrity and company officer accountability? What about air (SCBA) management…how far (and time) to get in and how far (and time) to get out? Whats the access, fire location (where is the fire?) fire progress (where was the fire and where is it going to be soon?), …how about auxiliary appliances (sprinklers? standpipes?) What is the immediate responding 1st alarm staffing? What about command staff? What resources are needed? What will be needed in 5, 10, 15 or more minutes?
So many of us are used to usually operating in the single or multi family dwelling fire-with its challenges, but the large area structure is an entirely different fire. It’s truly a high risk/low frequency event-which means while it doesn’t occur often, when it does, there are numerous ways for us to get into trouble.
We took time this morning to pull some links (articles and videos) to share with you on The Secret List…and while we all pray for the family of the Pineville Firefighter Richard Sheltra along with his Brother and Sister PFD, CFD and area Firefighters and friends, and we await the facts, …there is much to gain in reminding ourselves-and training ourselves (all ranks from those on the line to those in command) on the challenges of large area commercial fires. 
ARTICLES:
THE SW SUPERMARKET-LODD FF BRET TARVER:
LARGE AREA SEARCH:
CONDUCTING THE SEARCH:
STRIP MALL FIRE DANGERS
THE SEARCH TOOL BOX:
IS LARGE AREA SEARCH THE ANSWER?
STRIP MALL FIRES:
WHAT WOULD YOU DO? STRIP MALL FIRES:
STRIP MALLS POSE NUMEROUS DANGERS:
ROPE ASSISTED SEARCH:
COMMERCIAL BUILDING FIRES & APPLIANCES
MAYDAY-REALITY VS MYTH:
VIDEOS:
The Bret Tarver Story:
(A MUST WATCH)
More Raw Video From The Above Fire:
More Video From The Above Fire/USFA:
Simulation of The Above Fire:
Strip Mall Fire Simulation:
Strip Mall Fire Size Up:
3rd ALARM STRIP MALL FIRE:
Firefighter Down Drill:
Once again, our sincerest prayers and condolences to the Pineville families, friends and Firefighters for last nights horrible loss of FF Sheltra.
Take Care. be Careful. Pass It On.
BillyG
The Secret List 6-1-2016-1600 Hours